Message from the President

Message from the President

Welcome to the University of Redlands

A message from University of Redlands President Dr. Ralph W. Kuncl:

When I see Redlands students, I see our future. I know that our professors have given them, to quote Albert Einstein, “the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks.” I see young people who will not be merely prepared for what their first employer wants, but also have the flexibility to change careers 30 years later.

Our rich history goes back to 1907 with the stated mission “to mold the mind and the heart so that in the conflict of life, keenness and conscience shall go forth together.” More than a century later, students continue to be at the center of a diverse and enriching academic experience, and the mission remains fundamentally unchanged: educating minds and hearts.

I get to see the triumphs of this education every day, when I cross paths with students who are flourishing and creating a solid liberal arts foundation they can use to both make a living and enjoy a purpose-driven life.

Since my arrival, we’ve been focused on several major initiatives: the expansion of affordability and access; the creation of a University Village; comprehensive internationalization, inclusiveness and community; the launch of a major fundraising campaign; the enhancement of existing departments and programs; and the use of digital media, to name a few.

But Redlands isn’t my university; it’s our University. Our impact spreads across the globe to wherever we have current students, alumni, parents and friends. If we keep our eyes on the future, a liberal arts education from Redlands will continue to prepare generations to embrace new ideas, learn how to be lifetime learners, and connect hearts and minds to service as global citizens.

You know well that some of the biggest problems our world faces today — climate change, environmental toxins, neighboring nations at war, refugees, the geopolitics of water and oil, gun control, and immigration and displaced persons — all require critical and ethical thinking. Being a global citizen today requires a solid understanding of cultural, political and societal differences, the kind of awareness that a broad, unbounded education can foster. And that is what we are here to do: provide a foundation for that balance and self-realization while keeping an eye on quality.

Come with me, if you will. And as we jump off together into the dreams of our future, let’s remember what Cornel West said about faith: “We've forgotten that a rich life consists fundamentally of serving others, trying to leave the world a little better than you found it. ... In many instances we will be stepping out on nothing, and just hoping to land on something.” Let us dream together, and continue to ask, “Why not?”